seamus dubhghaill

Promoting Irish Culture and History from Little Rock, Arkansas, USA


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Death of Arthur French, Member of Parliament

Arthur French, Irish Whig politician, patriot, orator, opportunist and hunter, dies on November 24, 1820.

French belongs to the long-established French family of Frenchpark, County Roscommon, who are substantial landowners who also make money in the wine trade. He is the eldest son of Arthur French MP and Alicia Magenis, daughter of Richard Magenis of Dublin and sister of Richard Magenis. He marries Margaret Costello, daughter of Edmond Costello of Edmondstown, County Mayo, and has nine children, including Arthur French, 1st Baron de Freyne, John, 2nd Baron and Charles, 3rd Baron.

In 1783, French is elected a Member of Parliament (MP) for Roscommon County in the Irish House of Commons. After the Act of Union 1800 he represents Roscommon in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. He is alleged to have been offered an Earldom if he would support the union of Ireland with Great Britain but refuses the honour. Later he also refuses a Barony with no strings attached, although in time three of his sons would hold the title Baron de Freyne. The Crown is frequently irritated by his demands for offices and favours for his brothers and sons, although such behaviour is entirely typical of an Irish politician at the time.

A critic of the policy of collective fines as a deterrent to the illicit distillation of poteen, French incurs the wrath of Chief Secretary for Ireland Robert Peel who calls him “an Abominable fellow,” but his enormous popularity in Roscommon means that he cannot be ignored. He also criticizes the continuation of martial law in Ireland.

By 1817 French is complaining of ill-health. He dies on November 24, 1820. One report at the time states that he had died “from excessive fox hunting.”


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Birth of Novelist Annie French Hector

Annie French Hector, a popular 19th-century novelist who writes under the pen name “Mrs. Alexander,” is born in Dublin on June 23, 1825.

Hector is the only child of Robert French, a Dublin solicitor. Her family claims to be descended from Irish gentry, the French family of Roscommon and Lord Annaly. On the paternal side, she is related to the poet Charles Wolfe and on her mother’s side, to the Shakespearian scholar, Edmund Malone. Her father loses his money in 1844 and moves first to Liverpool before settling in London.

Hector marries the explorer and archaeologist Alexander Hector in 1858 and together they have four children. She writes several novels during her early life, the first being Kate Vernon in 1854. However, her husband disapproves of her writing so she remains unpublished in his lifetime.

After Alexander Hector’s death in 1875, she uses his first name as her pseudonym and publishes over forty novels as “Mrs. Alexander,” many published by George and Richard Bentley. Among her books, all of which enjoy a wide popularity in the United States, are The Wooing O’t (1873), Ralph Wilton’s Weird (1875), Her Dearest Foe (1876), The Freres (1882), A Golden Autumn (1897), A Winning Hazard (1897), and Kitty Costello (1902).

Hector’s final novel, Kitty Costello, which presents an Irish girl’s introduction to English life and has autobiographic touches, is written when she is 77 years old and is barely completed at her death. A witty, clever talker, of quick sympathies and social instincts, Hector is in many ways abler and broader-minded than is shown in her writings. She dies in London, after suffering from neuritis for ten years, on July 10, 1902, and is buried in Kensal Green Cemetery.