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Promoting Irish Culture and History from Little Rock, Arkansas, USA


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Pope John Paul II Meets Jubilee 2000 Delegation

geldof-bono-pope-john-paul-iiBob Geldof, Bono, Quincy Jones and other members of an international lobby group meet with Pope John Paul II in Rome on September 23, 1999 to discuss the cancellation of third world debt repayments.

In an extraordinary meeting, marking 100 days to the millennium, Pope John Paul II makes a strong appeal to world to leaders to take urgent and decisive action towards resolving the debt crisis that afflicts the world’s poorest countries.

Speaking during a meeting with an international Jubilee 2000 delegation of economists, artists and campaigners, the Pope questions why progress in resolving the debt problem is so slow, and expresses impatience with the protracted negotiations. He warns that it “is the poor that pay the cost of indecision and delay.”

The Pope says “the Catholic Church looks at the situation with great concern. Not because she has any concrete technical model of development to offer, but because she has a moral vision of what the good of individuals and of the human family demands. She has consistently taught that there is a ‘social mortgage‘ on all private property, a concept which today must also be applied to ‘intellectual property‘ and to ‘knowledge.’ The law of profit alone cannot be applied to that which is essential for the fight against hunger, disease and poverty.”

Addressing the Pope on behalf of the delegation, Ann Pettifor, director and co-founder of Jubilee 2000, appeals to the Vatican to prevail upon the world’s leaders to meet again before the New Year, to cancel debts that result in the deaths of 20,000 children every day. She says, “This is a day that will go down in history. The Pope has given his endorsement and blessing to the passion and commitment of millions of Jubilee 2000 campaigners around the world. It is now up to the world’s leaders to rise to the Pope’s call and moral leadership.”

Following the meeting Bob Geldof says, “Were the spirit of this frail old man mirrored in a practical way by our political leaders, then the final push of political will to eradicate this unnecessary tragedy, would be easily achieved…and I liked his shoes!”

Professor Jeffrey Sachs adds, “With 100 days left to the millennium, we are halfway up the summit. But much more is needed. For hundreds of millions of the world’s poorest people, the Pope’s message today is crucial: the time is urgent for rich and poor to take the full and bold measure of debt cancellation that is so vitally needed.”

Bono summed it up saying, “His everyday courage amazes me. As aged as he is and as infirm as he has been, he will, you know, hang out with a bunch of pop stars…who could turn this man down?”

(Source: “Pope meets Bobo and calls for debt relief,” The Guardian, September 23, 1999)

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Death of Poet & Barrister Samuel Ferguson

sir-samuel-ferguson

Sir Samuel Ferguson, Irish poet, barrister, antiquarian, artist, and public servant, dies in Howth, County Dublin on August 9, 1886. Ferguson is perhaps the most important Irish poet of the 19th century. Due to his interest in Irish mythology and early Irish history he is seen as a forerunner of William Butler Yeats and the other poets of the Irish Literary Revival.

Ferguson is born in Belfast on March 10, 1810. He lives at a number of addresses, including Glenwhirry, where he acquires the love of nature that informs his later work. He is educated at the Belfast Academy and the Belfast Academical Institution, and then moves to Dublin to study law at Trinity College, obtaining his bachelor’s degree in 1826 and his masters degree in 1832.

Because his father has exhausted the family property, Ferguson is forced to support himself through his student years. He turns to writing and is a regular contributor to Blackwood’s Magazine by the age of 22. He is called to the bar in 1838, but continues to write and publish, both in Blackwood’s and in the newly established Dublin University Magazine.

Ferguson settles in Dublin, where he practises law. In 1848, he marries Mary Guinness, a great-great-niece of Arthur Guinness and the eldest daughter of Robert Rundell Guinness, founder of Guinness Mahon bank. At the time he is defending the Young Irelander poet Richard Dalton Williams.

In addition to his poetry, Ferguson contributes a number of articles on topics of Irish interest to antiquarian journals. In 1863, he travels in Brittany, Ireland, Wales, England, and Scotland to study megaliths and other archaeological sites. These studies are important to his major antiquarian work, Ogham Inscriptions in Ireland, Wales and Scotland, which is edited after his death by his widow and published in 1887.

His collected poems, Lays of the Western Gael is published in 1865, resulting in the award of a degree LL.D. honoris causa from Trinity College. He writes many of his poems in both Irish and English translations. In 1867, Ferguson retires from the bar to take up the newly created post of Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in Ireland. As reward for his services, he receives a knighthood in 1878.

Ferguson’s major work, the long poem Congal is published in 1872 and a third volume, Poems, in 1880. In 1882, he is elected President of the Royal Irish Academy, an organisation dedicated to the advancement of science, literature, and antiquarian studies. His house in North Great George’s St., Dublin, is open to everyone interested in art, literature or music.

Ferguson dies on August 9, 1886 in Howth, just outside Dublin city, and is buried in Donegore near Templepatrick, County Antrim.